Armed group’s leader refuses private FBI talk. 

Bundy arrived Friday at the airport in Burns, where the FBI has been monitoring the occupation, but left shortly afterward because federal authorities wanted the conversation to be private.

Doesn’t Bundy know that nothing is private before God? The thought of prison must have been getting too real for him.

Some of the greatest world leaders did their best work in prison, no?

Oh ye of little faith!

Source: Armed group’s leader refuses private FBI talk | News, Weather, Sports, Breaking News | KATU

US Air Force shelves Warthog plane retirement amid IS fight: media

Washington (AFP) – The US Air Force will delay retiring the A-10 — a stalwart attack aircraft beloved by ground troops — because of the ongoing fight against the Islamic State group, a military news site reported Wednesday.

So basically, the USA is going to invade Iraq as it did Afghanistan, i.e. it will eliminate the competing insurgency, ISIS, with Iraqi troops. The significant factor will be that these troops will be Arab instead of Iranian.

Doing the same thing and expecting different results is the definition of insanity.

In other words, we are creating another Afghanistan.

While those already  fighting in Afghanistan will be ahead of the curve, I wonder about the POTUS nominations. Will they be prepared?

Another 10 years in Iraq?

Source: US Air Force shelves Warthog plane retirement amid IS fight: media – Yahoo News

More armed men visit site of Oregon wildlife refuge standoff.

The network, a consortium of groups from Oregon, Washington and Idaho, arrived at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge midmorning in a convoy of about 18 vehicles, carrying rifles and handguns and dressed in military attire and bulletproof vests.

The people of the USA were well served by the fed’s decision to not bring the Harney County resolution to a quick close. Their inaction brought the big-boys out, who, if the federal government was looking at the situations strategically, were the ones they should have been targeting in the first place. The 3%’ers are the only organization who can really represent the insurgency forming in the USA today.

The Bundys were the Sarah Palin of militia groups, no real threat, but not  someone in a position to negotiate either.

Even though they might not really represent the situation locally, the 3%’ers are in a position open to negotiations.

 

Source: More armed men visit site of Oregon wildlife refuge standoff – Yahoo News

Democracy, Work, and Wealth | Harold Jarche | LinkedIn

Old mental models will not help us much. If we do not address wealth distribution, then we won’t be able to deal with other issues, such as climate change or environmental degradation. We need people who have the time to think about these. This has traditionally been the middle class, but it is shrinking in most developed countries. The rich alone do not give us the necessary diversity of opinions. An aggressively engaged and intelligent citizenry, in significant numbers, is needed to deal with the wicked problems facing us. Addressing wealth inequality will give us the people and the space to do so.

via Democracy, Work, and Wealth | Harold Jarche | LinkedIn.

Because of its large vertical command force (maybe we could call it an “on demand” force) the consumer economy has a structure similar to that of an insurgency. The hierarchical structure that the consumer economy uses to get its “things” is still present, but busy.

The problem with a consumer economy seems to be that the gap between the wealthy and poor gets wider, as the economy fades. So likely what happens is that when the wealthy gain control, as the poorer consumer insurgency loses their ability to command, a new greater hierarchic structure comes into being, and built off the one that is still present. In other words, the “Mitt Romney” of the once powerful consumer economy takes command.

The problem, if I am understanding the post the above quote comes from correctly, in the US these large platform corporations such as Apple, Microsoft, and Google are mostly foreign. At least the majority of their workers are. So if this hierarchical structure gets too “American” and isolates much of the world, these “foreign workers” will not become a part of the “American” economy and there is no structure in the US that can replace them. These computer products are all hand built, and there are just not that many “hands” in the US worker base to replace them.

Of course this is all a bunch of crazy talk, but given the scenario of a consumer economy collapsing, the real problem with this new stronger form of a hierarchical structure taking hold in America will be that the once powerful insurgent consumer structure will change from a negative slope to a positive slope (from a -5/2 to a possible +5/2).

The problem being, a positive sloped economic structure most commonly supports a civil war instead of an insurgency.

Squatter is not a 4 letter word

It was probably a mistake, but I called my step-son’s friend  a squatter. My step-son’s response was to say, “a squatter is someone who can’t pay,” and noted that Sam can pay.

But I didn’t accuse Sam of being a renter. I based the label of “squatter” on Stephen’s history of having to help Sam move under derrest in the last few places Sam, and my step-son when he doesn’t live with us, lived.

It should be interesting to hear what Sam says. Labels shouldn’t be important, but, more likely than less, they are.

America’s Defense Amnesia

“blowing themselves up.”

By “blowing themselves up I mean, an insurgency is a sine wave. It has a magnitude of a magnum 9 earthquake when the structure of  its wave has a 6/2  slope.

That’s much like blowing oneself up when the insurgency reaches the bottom of the downward slope and there is only 1 event of the greatest magnitude.

On the other hand, civil war is a square wave. It has close and far, and deep and shollow, but the magnitude is only like a magnum 4 earthquake.

That’s not so bad. Given time and a high birth rate (where 72 virgins really come in handy) and you will hardly be able to tell that the explosion went off.

Not so with an insurgency. When it reaches its point of singularity (the bottom of its downward slope)… BANG!

That’s it.

I don’t think the US, because it is a Republic, has ever had an insurgency. China had one in Chairman Mao, and 60 million people died. The closest the US came to having an insurgency was when Nixon was POTUS.

But then the insurgency kinda fizzled out, when they started calling themselves Baby Boomers and the leaders Republicans  :)

via zenpundit.com » Blog Archive » America’s Defense Amnesia.

The Economics of the Indo-Pacific Pivot

As I have said before, all war is about economic considerations and fought by people with few economic consideration.

Much has been said, in our pivot towards the Asian Pacific, about the people with few economic considerations.

We have heard about the saber-rattling of China in the disputed South China Sea and elsewhere.  This saber-rattling doesn’t really seem to be much about economics. Perhaps now is the time we need to talk about the economic considerations in the Pivot.

Basically, economically we are going to do for those nations under our Indo-Pacific pivot what we did for the Middle East. We are going to use our military to uphold the relevancy of the US dollar.

Perhaps the quip used by one of the characters in the movie “Tinker, Tailor,  Soldier,  Spy” can be used to clarify what I mean by “doing” to the Indo-Pacific what we did for the Middle East.

In the movie there was a change of leadership in the “Circus”. The Circus is where  the odd performers of the British secret service get together and put on a show for everyone else in the Service to see. The new Ringleader, to show his knowledge of how things are in the world made the statement that, “you can rent an Arab, but never buy one.”

I don’t know if that statement is true or not, but by literally throwing billions of dollars into the environment of Iraq, after our invasion,  we “rented” thousands of Arabs. (I know the dollars in my wallet are mainly there for me to rent. They never stay in my wallet long enough to actually own.)

In other words, economics is not just about interest (which collecting interest is not popular in most areas of the Middle East) but a strong economy also depends a great deal on whose hard currency runs the show.

While there were many reason made for going to war in Iraq, strategically it was in the US’s interest to make sure “petrol dollars” also meant the US dollar.

As many experts have said, the Iraq war wasn’t about the US grabbing Iraq’s oil. The US doesn’t get its oil from the Middle East. The oil coming out of the Middle East is mostly going to China and other developing nations.

But what is important,economically for the US is that whoever buys oil in the Middle East uses US dollars. The US economy depends on the fact that they do.

With Turkey threatening to join the EU, France heavily into buying oil from Saddam, and rumors of Russia and China making gold the currency for oil, the relevancy of the US dollar was disappearing. I suggest that is no longer true.

While all strategy is flawed, and there is an on-going civil war throughout the Middle East, in the most part the US currency is still “the” currency of the world.

My guess is that the US dollar is the most relevant it has ever been in the Middle East, but the same cannot be said in the Asian Pacific.

http://www.ibtimes.com/sorry-mates-strictly-business-australia-wants-cut-out-us-dollar-trade-china-1161287#

A 1.6 billion infusion of US dollars and an occupation of US Marines may counteract that train of thought.